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Insulation Dictionary

A-weighted sound pressure level (dBA): An odd-numbered sound pressure level (dBA) obtained with the help of the A-weight network, which determines the influence of the noise on the medium and high frequencies and which is most sensitive to low- volume level.

 

Weighted impulse noise isolation improvement index (ΔLw): Represents the odd number value of the impulse noise isolation improvement index ΔL determined on a 1/3 octave band using a reference curve.

 

 

Weighted noise reduction indices (Rw, R'w): Represents the odd numbered isolation indices obtained by using a reference curve from the noise reduction index or the apparent noise reduction index values ​​of the element to indicate the insulation performances of the construction elements.

 

 

Weighted sound reduction enhancement index (ΔRw): Represents the odd number value of the sound reduction enhancement index ΔR, which is determined in 1/3 octave band, using a reference curve.

 

 

Weighted Sound Absorption Coefficient (αw): Represents the odd number value of the sound absorption value of the sound absorption using a reference curve.

 

 

Weighted standardized façade level difference (D2m, nT, w): The difference between the sound pressure level measured in the presence of a traffic noise or a special sound source 2 meters in front of Cephen and the sound pressure level in the receiving room is determined by reference to the reverberation reference value refers to the odd number of insulation indices obtained using a curve.

 

 

Weighted standardized impulse sound pressure level (L nT, w): Represents the odd numbered impulse response measured in the receiver chamber in the area measurements, obtained by using a reference curve from the reduced spectral value using a correction based on the reverberation time of the receiver chamber would.

 

 

Weighted standardized level difference (DnT, w): The difference between the place and time averages of the sound pressure levels produced by one or more sound sources in one room and the air-born sound in the other two rooms are obtained from the spectral value obtained by correcting for the reverberation time of the receiving room refers to the odd number of isolation indices obtained using a reference curve.

 

 

Acoustics: refers to the discipline of science that investigates topics such as the formation and spreading of sound waves, sound sources, hearing-sense-affecting, measurement, control technologies, and investigating possibilities of application.

 

 

Acoustic performance certificate: refers to the document showing the acoustic performance class as a result of the acoustic tests to be performed for all noise sensitive buildings or independent units according to the Regulations on the Protection against Blank Noise.

 

 

Acoustic performance class: This is the result of an evaluation made for an independent unit or building, depending on the internal noise levels in the buildings and in the independent units, the insulation values ​​of the building elements, the internal noise levels from the installation and service equipment and the reverberation times; A, B, C, D, E or F. (A, highest performance, F, lowest performance)

 

 

Acoustic project: refers to the project documents containing acoustic project and detail drawings, key figures, calculations and / or measurement results and evaluation reports prepared by using the provisions of the Regulation on Protection Against Noise of Buildings.

 

 

Receiver room: refers to the room where the sound is transmitted in a sound insulation measurement and where the receiver microphones are located.

 

 

Background noise (for buildings): refers to the total remaining noise measured in the same position and condition when the noise source examined in an environment or enclosure is not in operation.

 

 

Correction to the background noise: In an environment or indoor environment, refers to the process of finding the background noise by logarithmic subtraction from the measured total value.

 

 

Independent unit: According to the Law of Condominium Ownership numbered 634 and dated 23/6/1965, it refers to the part of a building which is suitable to be used separately and independently and subject to independent property.

 

 

Uncertainty value: An estimated value that defines the range in which the measured magnitude can be found around the actual value. (showing the reliability of the quality of the event and the results of the event)

 

Building acoustics: The surrounding area of ​​the buildings, the interior acoustics of the buildings within the buildings and the noise problems brought by the mechanical and electrical systems of the buildings with each other, refers to the sub-science branch of acoustics, including the reverberation sphere, which aims to prevent harmful sounds.

 

Building acoustics expert: refers to those who perform services such as preparing reports and acoustical project for building acoustics provided for in the Regulation on Protection Against Noise of Buildings, evaluation during construction, putting results with measurements after application.

 

 

Partitioning element: Vertical building elements such as walls, which contain components such as doors and windows, which separate the welding and receiving rooms, and building elements such as flooring and roof.

 

 

C - Weighted sound pressure level (dBC): Represents the odd number of sound levels obtained with the help of C weight network which is used in evaluating the noises with low frequency sounds up to 35 Hz.

 

 

Environmental noise or external noise: It may be caused by environmental noise or external noise: machinery and equipment used for transportation vehicles, road traffic, railway traffic, air way traffic, marine road traffic, wind turbines, outdoor area, industrial sites, workshops, workshops and similar enterprises refers to the noxious sounds of harmful or undesired air created during recreational and recreational areas, amusement parks, children's playgrounds, sports fields and human activities.

 

 

Impulse sound: refers to the sounds that cause two masses to strike one another or to produce a solid ambient sound that is transmitted directly to the building carrier system and to the building components, such as door bumps, foot sounds, goods extraction,

 

 

Impulse sound pressure level (Li): The impulse sound insulation refers to the energy averaged sound pressure level relative to various microphone positions in one of the 1/3 octave bands in the receiving room during excitation by the standard impulse sound source to measure the impulse sound insulation.

 

 

Impulse sound insulation: In the case of a standard impulse sound source modeling a stepped sound positioned upside down, it represents the value of the spectral or odd-numbered insulation indicator, which accounts for the acoustical conditions of the receiving room, obtained from the sound pressure level measured in the lower room.

 

 

Pulse noise insulation improvement index (ΔL): The difference between normalized pulse sound pressure levels measured in 1/3 octave bands in the layered and non-layered states of a reference pile used to indicate the performance of an additional layer used to increase the insulation value of a building element against impact noise in laboratory measurements refers to the unit of representation.

 

 

Decibel (dB): refers to the unit of "level" in which the power, intensity and pressure of the measured sounds are logarithmically expressed as a result of comparison with this reference value, with reference to the lightest audible sound.

 

 

Exterior building elements: Exterior elements that are exposed to outside noise sources and other environmental factors; refers to building shell elements that include exterior walls, curtain walls, roofs, terraces, and open-bottom flooring elements that can include components such as doors and windows.

 

 

Direct transmission: refers to the transmission of sound to a building piece by the vibrating element of the piece or to the air behind the element, with gaps, such as solid media, or crevices, louvers and ventilation units on the element.

 

 

Indirect or lateral transmission: refers to the transmission of sound to other elements, such as side walls, ceiling, flooring, adjacent to these elements, other than the sound directly transmitted from the exterior structural element via the partition member from the adjacent room to a receiving room.

 

 

Flooring: Refers to building elements that divide the interior of the building horizontally or sloped.

 

 

Level difference (D): The sound pressure level difference between the space and time averages of the sound pressure levels generated by one or more audio sources in both rooms in each adjacent room.

 

 

Entertainment venue: refers to a business that operates on its own or in a self-contained facility, with electronic sounds and live music in the environment to meet the entertainment needs of the customer.

 

 

Equivalent sound absorption area (A): It is the product of a surface area and the absorption coefficient.

 

 

Equivalent continuous sound pressure level (Leq): A continuous fluctuating sound pressure level with equal energy of a fluctuating noise meter that changes sound pressure levels over a period of time. (Referred to as LAeq when measured in A weighted volume)

 

 

Maximum sound pressure level (LF, max): expresses the greatest value of the sound pressure levels measured using the fast response time weight within each octave band in a given measurement. (A LAF, referred to as max, when measured as weighted volume)

 

 

Frequency: Pure tone refers to the number of vibrations in the sound wave.

 

 

Frequency spectrum: refers to the graphical representation of the change in sound pressure levels according to frequencies in each of the noisy octaves and 1/3 octave bands.

 

 

Night level (Lgece or Lnight): Indicates the level of the external noises, which are obtained from the A weighted long-term average sounds and defined at night time.

 

 

Daytime-evening-night level (Lgag or Lden): Indicates the level of external environmental noises obtained from A weighted long-term average sounds.

 

 

Noise evaluation: refers to any method used to determine, estimate, or measure noisy negative effects using a noise indicator.

 

 

Noise indicator: A physical scale used to identify the negative impact of noise, which refers to units of evaluation that are used to express measurement results in a single number by applying specific weights.

 

 

Noise control: To completely or partially eliminate harmful effects from any sound source by reducing them to the level specified in the Regulation on Protection Against Noise, by changing the acoustic characteristic, reducing the influence interval, masking with another less disturbing sound points the operations carried out.

 

 

Noise control criterion or criterion (NR): A closed space refers to an odd-numbered evaluation method that evaluates the present noisy spectral qualities according to their hearing-perception characteristics.

 

 

Noise measurement: Measurement of the sound pressure levels of the noise or background noise caused by a source in the outer and inner environment with the help of electroacoustic measurement systems, spectral, temporal and statistical analysis and reporting of the results using the methods and devices specified in the relevant standard.

 

 

Noise criterion: refers to limit values ​​that determine in detail the various levels of noise tolerance that can be tolerated in order not to adversely affect human health, comfort, performance and work efficiency using a noise indicator.

 

 

Noise level: refers to the noisy production feature classified as high, medium and low, used to classify places according to their noise levels.

 

 

Low noise-sensitive buildings: administrative and commercial buildings, sports facilities, terminals, etc.

 

 

Very sensitive premises for noise: Housing refers to the use such as inpatient health facilities, children and elderly care homes, boarding education institutions, student dormitories, cultural facilities.

 

 

Noise-sensitive buildings: accommodation facilities with beds, educational institutions, religious facilities, such as use.

 

 

Non-noise-sensitive buildings: parking, garages, entertainment, industrial facilities, such as the source of noise, and noise-sensitive areas and usage refers to.

 

 

Air-born sound: refers to the sounds emitted in the air by the vibration of the sound source in the air and transmitted to distances.

 

 

Air-born sound insulation: refers to the value of the spectral or odd-numbered insulation indicator, which accounts for the acoustic conditions of the receiver chamber, obtained from the noise reduction that occurs when air is introduced behind the element of air born by a building element.

 

 

Hertz (Hz): Pure tone refers to the unit representing the number of vibrations of the sound wave.

 

 

Indoors Noise or Inner Noise: Mechanical and electrical installation noises in the building and all round neighborhood noise refers to the whole of unwanted and harmful sounds that adversely affect the people in the environment.

 

 

Solid environment-born sound: The solid environment that an impact source contacts refers to continuous or intermittent sounds, such as those that occur as a result of vibrating of the structure element and are transmitted in each direction in the element.

 

 

Source room: refers to the room where the noise source is located in a sound insulation measurement.

 

 

Neighborhood noisiness: Home activities and neighbors are noisy, and the noise is caused by the behavior and habits of the people in the house and various household tools; laundry, dishwashing, drying, sewing machines, refrigerator, washing machine, doors, windows closing, walking, loud speaking, yelling, children running and jumping, cleaning, pulling furniture, watching TV, listening to music with radio and electronic sound refers to the noises coming from stairs, corridors, and others in the common areas arising from such activities as the use of household appliances such as waste disposers, vacuum cleaners, pet feeding and modifications to be done in the building.

 

 

Intermittent sound: Repeated at regular or irregular intervals and sounds for at least 5 seconds.

 

 

Mechanical vibrations: A solid body refers to periodic vibrations that occur under the influence of a stimulus applied and are perceived as tactile sensations in frequencies below the hearing threshold.

 

 

Mechanical and electrical system noise: All air born sounds sourced from residential air conditioning units in buildings in or outside buildings, central air conditioning systems and equipment, plumbing equipment and pipes, elevators and generators.

 

 

Architectural acoustics report: refers to a report containing the sound insulation properties of building elements, details, relevant accounts and application principles.

 

 

Octave band: refers to the frequency band that is used to reveal the change of the sound pressure level according to frequency, with the upper and lower frequency limits being twice as high and equal to 70% of the bandwidth center frequency.

 

 

1/3 octave band: Each octave band refers to a frequency band that divides the band into 3, which allows more detailed analysis and is equal to 23% of the bandwidth center frequency.

 

 

Reverberation or reverberation time (T): The time it takes for the sound pressure level to decrease by 60 dB from the silence of a sound source operating in volume. It refers to a parameter that is used in the evaluation of sound insulation and determines a volume acoustic characteristic based on frequency.

 

 

Service equipment: Internal and external technical equipments such as heating, air conditioning, plumbing systems, pumps, generators, elevators, garage doors are required for the operation of the building.

 

 

Noise Reduction Improvement Index or Insulation Improvement Index (ΔR): The sound in layered and non-layered states measured in 1/3 octave bands, used to indicate the performance of an additional layer used to increase the insulation value of a building element against airborne sounds in laboratory measurements represents the unit of difference between reduction indices.

 

 

Limit value: refers to the maximum or minimum permissible level of insulation or noise indication in the Regulation on Protection Against Noise of Buildings.

 

Sound : The response of a vibrating object to pressure changes in an elastic environment. The sound waves in audible frequencies can be defined as the perception by the ear. It spreads in wave forms in the environment.

 

Noise Reduction Index (R): A unit of ten times the logarithm of the sound power W1 over a building element with respect to the ten base of the ratio of the sound power W2 to the sound power delivered from the element, and is used to indicate the noise reduction performance of the element.

 

 

Sound pressure level (Lp): refers to the value found in dB, found by multiplying the logarithm of the ratio of the sound pressure measured at a certain point in the environment to the reference sound pressure ratio of 20x10-6 Pa or 20 μP to 10 base, multiplied by 20.

 

 

Sound power level (Lw): The value expressed in dB, found by multiplying the logarithm of 10 base of the ratio of 10 to 12 watts reference sound power, the sound power of the sound source, to the audible lightest sound power, 10.

 

 

Sound emission level: refers to the sound power levels measured in the laboratory or in the field according to the relevant standards.

 

Sound insulation: includes all measures taken to reduce the levels of sound transmitted through the building elements.

 

 

Spectral level: A sound expresses the unweighted sound pressure levels of each octave or 1/3 octave bands, in other words, a noise of different frequency components.

 

 

Spectrum adaptation terms (Ctr, C, CI, Ctr, 50-3150, C50-3150, CI, 50-2500): For obtaining odd-numbered isolation indices, TS for octave or 1/3 octave bands using a specific standard frequency spectrum curve Refers to terms calculated according to EN ISO 717-1 and TS EN ISO 717-2 standards.

 

 

Standardized façade level difference (D2m, nT): refers to the difference between the sound pressure level measured by the existing traffic noise or a special sound source at 2 meters in front of Cephen and the sound pressure level in the receiving room corrected according to the reverberation term in the receiving room.

 

 

Standardized impulse sound pressure level (LnT): Represents the reduced spectral value of the measured impulse sound pressure level measured in the receiver chamber during field measurements using a correction based on the reverberation time of the receiver chamber.

 

 

Standardized level difference (DnT): The difference between the place and time averages of the sound pressure levels generated by one or more sound sources in one room or two sound rooms of the adjacent room expresses the spectral value obtained by correcting the receiver room according to the reverberation term.

 

 

Standardized equivalent continuous sound pressure level (Leq, nT): refers to the equivalent continuous sound pressure level standardized by taking 0.5 s as reference reverberation in octave or 1/3 octave bands (A when measured as weighted sound level, called LA, eq, nT ).

 

 

Standardized highest sound pressure level (LF, max, nT): refers to the standardized value of the highest sound pressure level measured on octave bands using the fast response time weight, based on the reverberation time of the room being measured and the reference reverberation time taken to 0.5 s (A weighted sound LAF, max, nT, when measured as a level).

 

 

Continuous sound: At any given time, the sound pressure level refers to sounds that are constant, wavy or slightly variable.

 

 

Carrier System: refers to every element and component of the carrier's carrier system and elements.

 

 

Repeatability: The same measurement method refers to the closeness of agreement between the same observer, the same measuring instrument, the same position, the same conditions of use, and repeated measurement results at short time intervals of the same measured size.

 

 

Insulation indicator: It refers to evaluation units which are used to express the sound insulation performances of the building elements according to the frequencies in a single number.

 

 

Construction component: It refers to complementary elements such as doors, windows, glass ventilation units, channel openings, shutters, etc., which are located on the building elements and have different materials and structures.

 

 

Building element: refers to the whole of the horizontal and vertical partitioning elements, which form the building scale with or without exterior walls, curtain walls, roofs and in-building conveyors, including building components such as windows and doors.

 

 

Floating flooring: refers to the type of floors where sound insulation is achieved by cutting the connection between the building components such as floor covering or screed layer under floor covering and the carrier or separator components of building such as flooring and wall flooring horizontally and vertically with flexible, pressure resistant, impact sound insulation layer would.