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CelluBOR Acoustic Material



The use of acoustic material has increased dramatically in recent years due to advances in technology and public concern about noise and pollution. Acoustic material is a high quality sound absorbing material as it is made entirely from natural materials. Therefore, the performance of the product remains constant throughout its lifetime. When an acoustic material is exposed to incident sound waves, the air molecules on the surface of the material and in the pores of the material are forced to vibrate and lose some of their original energy. This loss occurs because some of the energy is converted to heat due to thermal and viscous losses of the air molecules at the walls of the internal pores and tunnels in the material. At low frequencies these changes are isothermal, while at high frequencies they are adiabatic. Acoustic material is made from cellulose. Cellulose can be easily recycled and is a renewable resource, so it is environmentally friendly and harmless to humans due to its natural metrics. Cellulose-based materials, such as recycled newspapers, papers, etc., are commonly used to acoustically insulate ceilings, walls and difficult spaces in construction, reducing noise pollution.



Material Specifications

Based on colour, acoustic material can be divided into six types:

 

 

Based on the colors in the background of the building and the personal opinion of the client, any of these six colors can be chosen. The only differences are in the colors and the materials, which are all the same and made of high quality material that is completely environmentally friendly due to its natural ingredients. Acoustic materials have special properties that can have different absorption coefficients depending on their thickness. Accordingly, the following diagrams show the absorption coefficient of the material at a thickness of 25, 50, 75 and 100.

 

 

 

Sound Absorption Coefficient

Measuring the sound absorption coefficient in a reverberation chamber

Sample Hundredths of an area                      12,00 m2  

Volume of the room:                                       298,5 m3

Room collection area S                                  273,0 m2

 

 

frequency 

as

A(m2)

T1

T2

50

0

0

8.94

8.9

63

0.03

0.4

11.9

10.85

80

0.09

1.1

6.14

5.37

100

0.13

1.6

7.18

5.81

125

0.2

2.4

6.02

4.65

160

0.39

4.7

6.97

4.14

200

0.48

5.8

7.12

3.84

250

0.77

9.2

5.78

2.74

315

1.01

12.2

5.91

2.37

400

1.16

13.9

6.83

2.29

500

1.17

14.1

7.32

2.33

630

1.18

14.1

7.55

2.34

800

1.15

13.8

7.39

2.36

1000

1.12

13.4

6.57

2.31

1250

1.08

12.9

5.74

2.25

1600

1.06

12.8

5.2

2.18

2000

1.06

12.8

5.11

2.17

2500

1.08

13

4.67

2.07

3150

1.09

13.1

4.1

1.95

4000

1.07

12.8

3.31

1.78

5000

1.07

12.9

2.82

1.63